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Remember Sophie Delezio? Well She's All Grown Up!

In 2003 it was just a normal day for Sophie Delezio and her family when tragedy struck and changed the course of their lives forever.

The then two-year-old suffered horrific burns when a car crashed into her childcare centre.

Trapped under the burning vehicle, Sophie received burns to 85 per cent of her body.

She lost an ear, her hand and both legs to the accident and spent three months in a coma.

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The toddler’s resilience captured the nation’s hearts as she took on the tough road towards recovery.

Sadly, just three years later in 2006, tragedy struck again.

Sophie was hit by a car while in her stroller at a pedestrian crossing. The impact threw her 18 metres up the road and left her fighting for her life once again.

Her jaw, collarbone and ribs were broken, her lungs puncture, vertebrae fractured and she suffered a brain injury. 

However, once again Sophie proved she was a fighter.

Now 15, Sophie has joined The Morning Show and is proving that the resilience and smile that shone through as a child is still there.

The teen says the support she has received over the years has been incredible.

“It’s pretty amazing just to see how many people who supported me and know my story,” she said before explaining, “It’s really nice allowing people to look at me and to just… I don’t know how to explain it. It’s pretty cool”.

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Her mum, Carolyn Martin, says Sophie has a resilience and always knows how to make the best of things.

“One of her great strengths is that she gives it a go, gives it a red hot shot - pretty much would for whatever she sets her mind to,” she said.

So what’s in the future for the girl who continues to defy the odds?

The teenager has her sights set on the 2020 Paralympics where she hopes to join the Australian rowing team.

Till then, Sophie and her mum are promoting their Day of Difference Foundation – which hopes to reduce the incidence and impact of children’s critical injury in Australia.

With over 1000 children hospitalised each week, the Delezio family provide hope that there is a bright future at the end of it all. 

Photos: AAP

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